Book Reviews

Book Review: The Doctor by Lisa Stone

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: The Doctor by Lisa StoneThe Doctor by Lisa Stone
Published on June 24, 2019
Genres: Thriller, Fiction
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 390
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

When Emily and Ben move in next door to Dr Burman and his wife Anita, they are keen to get to know their new neighbours. Outgoing and sociable, Emily tries to befriend the doctor’s wife, but Anita is strangely subdued, barely leaving the house, and terrified of answering the phone.

When Emily goes missing a few weeks later, Ben is plunged into a panic. His wife has left him a note, but can she really have abandoned him for another man? Or has Emily’s curiosity about the couple next door led her straight into danger?

A gripping, sinister thriller with a twist you won’t see coming from the international bestseller Lisa Stone.

I’ll never trust a doctor again. Just kidding. Sort of. But seriously, The Doctor did not turn out to be the book I expected it to be. I was expecting a standard domestic thriller of some kind, but it evolved into something far darker and more convoluted than that.

I commend Lisa Stone for coming up with such a unique premise for a thriller. Though I have to wonder why the synopsis talked about “Emily going missing” when that doesn’t kick in until one of the later acts of the book, it’s a spoiler-y note to stick right in the book’s summary. Primarily because it doesn’t become an incentive or plot motivator until close to half-way through the story.

Speaking of, the third act of this book dragged on way too long for my liking. I don’t want to get into spoiler territory, but in regards to Emily’s kidnapping, the whole circus surrounding finding out what happened to her was repetitive and often involved characters being stupid for the sole purpose of extending the story.

The other aspect of this book I wasn’t too fond of was the primary antagonist, Amit. He was vile and misogynistic to the point of excess. His motivations didn’t feel strong enough because of his hatred for his wife. The Doctor isn’t my book and not my story to tell, but, I almost feel as if it would have been more interesting to make him a caring, increasingly desperate, man who spirals into madness because of his desire to save his wife.

Should you read The Doctor?

I think it depends on what you’re looking for in a thriller! If you want something with a refreshingly unique story, something you haven’t seen done a million times, then absolutely. The Doctor is riveting in its oddity and strangeness, and Stone is adept at weaving suspense into her storytelling.

It reminded me of an old-school R.L. Stine novel. I used to read them ALL the time as a kid and this book gave me some similar vibes. I mean that in a complimentary way! It does feel a little Frankenstein-y and deals with body horror. I liked that element. It should be classified as horror in addition to a thriller, in my opinion.

Once the story gets going, it’s hard to put the book down out of sheer desire to want to know how Amit, Alisha, and Emily’s journey will all play out. But if you’re expecting a more conventional thriller, then you might find yourself dissatisfied with the finished product.

Book Reviews

Book Review: The Boy in the Photo by Nicole Trope

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: The Boy in the Photo by Nicole TropeThe Boy in the Photo by Nicole Trope
Published on June 28th, 2019
Genres: Fiction, Thriller, Suspense
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 334
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

Megan waits at the school gates for her six-year-old son, Daniel As children come and go, the playground emptying, panic bubbles inside her. Daniel is nowhere to be found.

According to his teacher, Daniel’s father, Greg, has picked up his son. Except Greg and Megan are no longer together. After years of being controlled by her cruel husband, Megan has finally found the courage to divorce him. Hands trembling, she dials his number, but the line is dead.

Six years later, Megan is feeding baby daughter, Evie, when she gets the call she has dreamt about for years. Daniel has walked into a police station in a remote town just a few miles away. Her son is alive – and he’s coming home.

But their joyful family reunion does not go to plan. His room may have been frozen in time, with his Cookie Monster poster and stack of Lego under the bed, but Daniel is no longer the sweet little boy Megan remembers.

Imagine your child going missing for six years. That is the heart-stopping horror Megan must face when her abusive ex-husband decides to abduct their son, Daniel, from her and take him far, far away.

I’m not a mother, so I can’t say I’m able to 100% understand how Megan felt, but Trope is an astonishing writer. Regardless of whether or not you have children you’ll want to hug someone tight after reading this story. Grab your cat, if you must.

See, after six long years, years in which Megan was torn between wondering if her son was even still alive annd trying desperately to find him either way, Daniel returns home. But their reunion is not the happy ending you might anticipate. Daniel arrives as the product of years of turmoil, bitterness, and lies. Megan realizes that when praying for her son for all that time, she never anticipated what might happen if he came back completely different than the boy he was when he was taken.

In the time it took for Daniel to return, Megan moved on with her life, as best as she could. She remarried and had a second child. Daniel’s sudden reappearance in her life, while a blessing, causes an unprecedented upheaval of the stability she worked so hard to rebuild. Especially when she comes to realize that her son, her baby boy, may be harboring a dark secret that could threaten to destroy everything she’s struggled so hard for in the worst years of her life.

Even though the inevitable twist is somewhat predictable, it doesn’t detract from the moving, yet thrilling, nature of this story.

Should you read The Boy in the Photo?

Yes! Unlike other thrillers, this is a story with a heartfelt emotional core. It’s still a page-turner, but one that will leave you more satisfied and moved than the average one. I haven’t read Nicole Trope’s other books before but I’ll definitely check them out now!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Dear Wife by Kimberly Belle

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: Dear Wife by Kimberly BelleDear Wife by Kimberly Belle
Published on June 25, 2019
Genres: Fiction, Thriller
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 336
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

For nearly a year, Beth has been planning for this day. A day some people might call any other Wednesday, but Beth prefers to see it as her new beginning--one with a new look, new name and new city. Beth has given her plan significant thought, because one small slip and her violent husband will find her.

A couple hundred miles away, Jeffrey returns home from a work trip to find his wife, Sabine, is missing. Wherever she is, she's taken almost nothing with her. Her abandoned car is the only evidence the police have, and all signs point to foul play.

As the police search for leads, the case becomes more and more convoluted. Sabine's carefully laid plans for her future indicate trouble at home, and a husband who would be better off with her gone. The detective on the case will stop at nothing to find out what happened and bring this missing woman home. Where is Sabine? And who is Beth? The only thing that's certain is that someone is lying and the truth won't stay buried for long.

When I first started reading Dear Wife I immediately got sucked into it. Kimberly Belle is a great writer and she knows how to weave a taut thriller. I didn’t want to put it down! For a while, at least.

The story centers around the disappearance of a woman named Sabine. Her husband, Jeffrey, is desperate to find her. He and Sabine’s twin sister, Ingrid, do their best to track her down. Eventually a detective named Marcus is assigned to her case.

I don’t want to reveal much else and risk giving away the novel’s twist because it was fairly well done.

But around the halfway mark, the plot sort of fizzled out. It was around the time a church was introduced that I began to feel my desire to continue reading waning. The story began to drag and there were side characters added I didn’t care about.

Even that, though, is not my biggest issue with Dear Wife. No, my biggest issue with this novel is that it is rife with racist and transphobic descriptions. I mean some of the moments were so bad, so glaring, I can hardly believe a publisher approved it. Mind you, I was sent an ARC so it’s possible that some of these moments could be fixed before the novel is published but it’s worth mentioning.

I haven’t read Belle’s other novels but I understand she is highly praised in the book community. I’m not sure if this is a common trend in her books.

Literally every non-white character in this book is reduced to a racialized stereotype. It’s not subtle either.

Should you read Dear Wife?

In terms of thrillers, it is one of the best I’ve read this year, even if I felt disappointed by the second half of the story, I can still recognize its strengths. I understand why it is so highly praised by the book community. If you’re a big thriller fan, odds are you’ll pick this up. But personally, I’d rather recommend a book without such outdated and callous remarks about minorities.

Book Reviews

Storm and Fury by Jennifer L. Armentrout Review

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Storm and Fury by Jennifer L. Armentrout ReviewStorm and Fury (The Harbinger, #1) by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Series: The Harbinger #1
Published on June 11, 2019
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult, Romance
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 512
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

Eighteen-year-old Trinity Marrow may be going blind, but she can see and communicate with ghosts and spirits. Her unique gift is part of a secret so dangerous that she’s been in hiding for years in an isolated compound fiercely guarded by Wardens—gargoyle shape-shifters who protect humankind from demons. If the demons discover the truth about Trinity, they’ll devour her, flesh and bone, to enhance their own powers.

When Wardens from another clan arrive with disturbing reports that something out there is killing both demons and Wardens, Trinity’s safe world implodes. Not the least because one of the outsiders is the most annoying and fascinating person she’s ever met. Zayne has secrets of his own that will upend her world yet again—but working together becomes imperative once demons breach the compound and Trinity’s secret comes to light. To save her family and maybe the world, she’ll have to put her trust in Zayne. But all bets are off as a supernatural war is unleashed…

Book Review

Let me preface this review by stating that I don’t know anything about Jennifer Armentrout’s other books or stories. I decided to give Storm and Fury a try because the plot appealed to me. Gargoyles and demons? Okay, I’m listening.

However, ultimately, this book fell short for me. While I do enjoy reading young adult fiction, Storm and Fury harkened back to the early 2000s. I felt like I took a time machine a few years ago. How many times did I read the phrase “crap on a cracker” or a myriad of other cringe-worthy phrases that no real teenager would ever utter?

How do you do fellow kids meme - Storm and Fury reaction

The most substantial component of this book was the romance. Armentrout knows how to write sexual tension. Looking at her pedigree of romance novels, I can see why. The intimate scenes made me feel more than anything else in the story.

My main caveat with the story is it feels as if the mythos and worldbuilding came secondary to the romance. A great deal of exposition came from the protagonist info-dumping. That’s fine if you’re writing a romance novel, but this is meant to be a sweeping fantasy, and I didn’t feel like it was fleshed out enough.

There is nothing wrong with romance. I have my issues with the YA cliches, but I was okay with the one in this book. If only it didn’t overshadow everything else.

All that said, I did find something oddly compelling about the story, after all, I did finish it. The twists during the climax shocked me. But I wish they felt more earned. Vast swaths of this story meandered into nothingness. There wasn’t enough action, or there was too much talking. Regardless, this needs another round of editing.

Should you read Storm and Fury?

Honestly, I’m going to say no. You can find better written YA fantasy novels. Many of the plot points in here are retreads of those found in The Mortal Instruments. While there are some new and exciting concepts, they don’t get nearly enough time to shine, and therefore the storyline falls flat.

But, as I said, I’m not familiar with the world. Perhaps if I had read the other books surrounding this one first, I might feel more in touch with Storm and Fury. People who are already a fan of hers may find themselves enjoying this much more than I did.

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Book Reviews

Book Review: The Mother’s Mistake by Ruth Heald

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: The Mother’s Mistake by Ruth HealdThe Mother's Mistake by Ruth Heald
Published on June 11, 2019
Genres: Fiction, Thriller
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 374
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

Claire’s life is picture perfect. A new home in the countryside. A new-born baby. A doting husband by her side. But behind closed doors, her life is falling apart. And when a threatening note is posted through her letterbox, saying she doesn’t deserve her daughter, it’s clear that someone knows about her past…

Someone knows that Claire doesn’t deserve her perfect life. Someone’s going to do everything in their power to destroy it.

Claire is a brand new mother who is struggling to connect to her daughter, Olivia. Recently relocated to a family cabin of her husband’s, Claire feels out of touch and increasingly alienated from the world around her. Olivia is impossible to manage, her husband, Matt, is never home, and her nosy mother-in-law appears to be doing everything she can to put a wedge between their marriage.

With all the stress she’s under, it’s not surprising then that Claire succumbs to post-natal depression and a resurgence to drink after years of being sober. Her life at the cottage becomes increasingly dark as she begins to fear for both her life and that of her child’s. Is someone stalking her? Is she paranoid?

Heald weaves a compelling narrative that makes it difficult to tell who to trust, both for Claire and the reader. As is common with psychological thrillers, Claire is not a reliable narrator. It works well for the plot because a great portion of this story will force the reader to battle with the protagonist. Are we on Claire’s side or not? Do we believe her or do we think she’s losing her grip?

As a thriller, The Mother’s Mistake works well on multiple levels. The tension is palpable. It’s hard to know who to trust. And there are enough chilling moments to keep you glued to the page and eager to know what comes next.

However, there are a few weaknesses that kept me from giving this a full five stars. I think this book was too long. There were some chapters where the pacing began to slow. At times I felt as if I was being dragged around in circles. Claire would often contend with the same battles over and over again to the point it became repetitive. It could have done with another round of pruning to make it sharper and increase the sense of urgency to find out what was going to happen to Claire and Olivia.

I also found the main twist too predictable from an early point in the novel. That said, there was a supplemental twist I hadn’t entirely pieced together that flowed quite nicely. Overall, I was pleased with the outcome because it did feel well-plotted.

Still, there was also a sub-plot involving Matt and his ex that took up a significant portion of the story and ultimately didn’t amount to much. I wish it had tied into the main thread more.

SHOULD YOU READ IT?

Yes. The Mother’s Mistake is a stunning debut into the thriller genre from author Ruth Heald. She knows Claire inside and out, and the story shows it. If you’re someone who reads psychological thrillers on the regular, you won’t be disappointed by this one.

Heald has a knack for building in her atmosphere through slow, creeping reveals. When Claire is frightened, you’ll be frightened. When Claire is on the brink of discovery, you’ll have your fingers trembling over the next page in an eager rush to see what comes next.

Book Reviews

Book Review: Keep This to Yourself by Tom Ryan

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: Keep This to Yourself by Tom RyanKeep This to Yourself by Tom Ryan
Published on May 21, 2019
Genres: Mystery, Fiction, Thriller, Suspense, LGBTQ+
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 307
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

It’s been a year since the Catalog Killer terrorized the sleepy seaside town of Camera Cove, killing four people before disappearing without a trace.

Like everyone else in town, eighteen-year-old Mac Bell is trying to put that horrible summer behind him—easier said than done since Mac’s best friend Connor was the murderer’s final victim. But when he finds a cryptic message from Connor, he’s drawn back into the search for the killer—who might not have been a random drifter after all. Now nobody—friends, neighbors, or even the sexy stranger with his own connection to the case—is beyond suspicion. Sensing that someone is following his every move, Mac struggles to come to terms with his true feelings towards Connor while scrambling to uncover the truth.

So this book hooked me immediately given its premise is about a serial killer terrorizing a small town known as Candle Cove. I’m always a sucker for a good serial killer story. I also love the fact the main character is gay.

However, my main issue with Keep This to Yourself was in the characterization. I found myself struggling to connect with any of the characters because none of them felt very three-dimensional. For the most part they were written in a shallow way (and that’s not to say the book is shallow only that these characters didn’t have as much depth as I would have liked).

But I did still enjoy this book overall. I liked following Mac’s journey to finding out the truth about what happened to his best friend, Connor, who he may or may not have been secretly in love with. I liked seeing him to get find a new relationship with someone who had also lost someone to the “Catalog Killer”.

Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone looking for an absorbing, quick read, but it wasn’t one of my favorites. As far as Young Adult fiction goes though, this is one of the better ones I’ve read in a while so if that’s your thing then I say you should give it a shot.

Book Reviews

Book Review: Before She Knew Him by Peter Swanson

Book Review: Before She Knew Him by Peter SwansonBefore She Knew Him by Peter Swanson
Published on March 5, 2019
Genres: Mystery, Fiction, Thriller
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 309
Format: Hardcover

Source: Book of the Month

Catching a killer is dangerous—especially if he lives next door

Hen and her husband Lloyd have settled into a quiet life in a new house outside of Boston, Massachusetts. Hen (short for Henrietta) is an illustrator and works out of a studio nearby, and has found the right meds to control her bipolar disorder. Finally, she’s found some stability and peace.

But when they meet the neighbors next door, that calm begins to erode as she spots a familiar object displayed on the husband’s office shelf. The sports trophy looks exactly like one that went missing from the home of a young man who was killed two years ago. Hen knows because she’s long had a fascination with this unsolved murder—an obsession she doesn’t talk about anymore, but can’t fully shake either.

Could her neighbor, Matthew, be a killer? Or is this the beginning of another psychotic episode like the one she suffered back in college, when she became so consumed with proving a fellow student guilty that she ended up hurting a classmate?

The more Hen observes Matthew, the more she suspects he’s planning something truly terrifying. Yet no one will believe her. Then one night, when she comes face to face with Matthew in a dark parking lot, she realizes that he knows she’s been watching him, that she’s really on to him. And that this is the beginning of a horrifying nightmare she may not live to escape.

Henrietta Mazur is an artist most commonly known for drawing disturbing paintings and etchings. She now works as a successful children’s book illustrator. Recently, she and her husband, Lloyd, relocated to a new neighborhood for a fresh start. Who knew that Hen’s dark tendencies would lead her straight into the mouth of a serial killer?

Do you know that saying about “never really knowing your neighbors”? It doesn’t quite apply here in Swanson’s methodical novel Before She Knew Him. The thing is, Hen’s entire problem is that she does know her neighbor is. She figures it out before anyone else can.

What do you do when you learn the man living no more than yards away from you is a murderer? That is the basis of this novel, and boy did I enjoy going on the journey for the answer to that question.

I have never read Swanson’s work before, but he has a new fan in me now. I sometimes shy away from reading novels written by men in this genre, particularly when they have female protagonists, but I was pleasantly surprised by Hen’s character. She doesn’t fit into the typical hard-drinking, edgy, women we’ve come to expect from psychological thrillers. She felt fully-realized and developed, as did all the other characters.

Yes, I did figure out the direction this book was going pretty early on, but I attribute that as a credit to the author. I will always choose to unfold a story where the twists and turns genuinely make sense over one where the sole purpose is to shock me. I don’t mind when I figure it out before the end if it is well-executed and this story is.

Authors who are adept at foreshadowing know how to render a palpable twist that will still engage you even if you do manage to solve it ahead of time.

I snagged this book a couple of months back when it became available from BoTM, and I’m delighted I did. I only regret taking so long to read it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Carmilla by Kim Turrisi

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: Carmilla by Kim TurrisiCarmilla by Kim Turrisi, Shaftesbury Sales Company
Published on May 7, 2019
Genres: Fiction, LGBTQ+, Young Adult, Fantasy
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 224
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

An adaptation of Shaftesbury's award-winning, groundbreaking queer vampire web series of the same name, Carmilla mixes the camp of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the snark of Veronica Mars, and the mysterious atmosphere of Welcome to Nightvale. Newly escaped from the stifling boredom of a small town, college freshman Laura is ready to make the most of her first year at Silas University. But when her roommate, Betty, vanishes and a sarcastic, nocturnal philosophy student named Carmilla moves into Betty's side of the room, Laura decides to play detective. Turns out Betty isn't the first girl to go missing? She's just the first girl not to come back.

All over campus, girls have been vanishing, and they are completely changed when (or if) they return. Even more disturbing are the strange dreams they recount: smothering darkness, and a strange pale figure haunting their rooms. Dreams that Laura is starting to have herself. As Laura closes in on the answers, tensions rise with Carmilla. Is this just a roommate relationship that isn't working out, or does Carmilla know more than she's letting on about the disappearances? What will Laura do if it turns out her roommate isn't just selfish and insensitive, but completely inhuman? And what will she do with the feelings she's starting to have for Carmilla?

I have heard quite a bit about Carmilla over the years. I’ve yet to get around to watching the web series, and I don’t know much about the history behind Carmilla, I was primarily interested in this book because of the romantic relationship between two women. I thought if I got into the book, I could check out the web series after (I tend to read before I watch).

But unfortunately, I didn’t make it far into this book before deciding it wasn’t for me. The writing style is far too condensed, and the author tends to tell rather than show. I didn’t feel a distinctive voice for any character, and therefore it failed to grip me.

Book Reviews

Book Review: Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuistonRed, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston
Published on May 14, 2019
Genres: Fiction, LGBTQ+, Contemporary, Romance
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 425
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

A big-hearted romantic comedy in which the First Son falls in love with the Prince of Wales after an incident of international proportions forces them to pretend to be best friends...

First Son Alex Claremont-Diaz is the closest thing to a prince this side of the Atlantic. With his intrepid sister and the Veep’s genius granddaughter, they’re the White House Trio, a beautiful millennial marketing strategy for his mother, President Ellen Claremont. International socialite duties do have downsides—namely, when photos of a confrontation with his longtime nemesis Prince Henry at a royal wedding leak to the tabloids and threaten American/British relations.

The plan for damage control: staging a fake friendship between the First Son and the Prince. Alex is busy enough handling his mother’s bloodthirsty opponents and his own political ambitions without an uptight royal slowing him down. But beneath Henry’s Prince Charming veneer, there’s a soft-hearted eccentric with a dry sense of humor and more than one ghost haunting him.

As President Claremont kicks off her reelection bid, Alex finds himself hurtling into a secret relationship with Henry that could derail the campaign and upend two nations. And Henry throws everything into question for Alex, an impulsive, charming guy who thought he knew everything: What is worth the sacrifice? How do you do all the good you can do? And, most importantly, how will history remember you?

In our current harrowing political climate, a book like Red, White & Royal Blue is an exhilarating breath of fresh air. The romance between Alex and Henry is founded in a strong foundation of snark, charm, and sheer chemistry. Casey McQuiston is a real talent.

Initially, I didn’t think I would enjoy this book as I’m not always a fan of romantic stories but it’s impossible to not find yourself immersed in the world. The characters are richly defined and the romance is sexy yet full of adoration. It is incredibly well-developed and I loved being privy to watching this story unfold.

Book Reviews

Book Review: Fruit of the Gods by William C. Tracey

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: Fruit of the Gods by William C. TraceyFruit of the Gods by William C. Tracey
Genres: Fantasy, LGBTQ+, Fiction
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

Sisters Kisare and Belili uproot an ancient box in their owner’s orchard and find a miracle inside: a fifth godfruit in a society that knows only four. It is punishable by death to eat godfruit, so the sisters hide the discovery and plot to escape servitude for good. With the power represented in the box, they could live as nobles themselves.

But Kisare finds her new freedom more difficult than she imagined, and Belili has many secrets she strives to keep hidden. With the help of a people slowly losing their culture and technology to the powerful nobles, the sisters lead an infiltration of the highest levels of noble society.

While Kisare finds she cares for the captured leader of the people helping them, Belili comes to love her noble suitor’s guard—a fierce woman with a similar past to her own. In the end, the fifth godfruit may bring harmony to the world, but the sisters’ only hope of succeeding lies in deciphering ancient mythologies surrounding the gods’ original plan for their people.

Fruit of the Gods is a unique fantasy novel with a surprisingly complex system of magic. It navigates the tropes of the genre with relative ease, delivering a story that bypasses overly predictable beats. For the most part, I was immersed in Kisare and Bel’s world, enriched by the imaginative culture the author created and surprisingly delighted by the fact one of the main characters was gay.

But still, I felt some parts of the book were too dense and it slowed the pacing down to a slog at times. The characters too, were not always as fleshed out as they needed to be. The alternating perspectives between the sisters also made the book far more confusing than it should have been. I wish the chapters were marked with the name of whichever sister would be narrating each passage instead of it randomly switching back and forth.

Still, I appreciate the novel’s ingenuity and I enjoyed myself reading it.