Interviews

Interview with Swamp Thing star, Derek Mears

Derek Mears talks to 1428 Elm about how amazing it was to work with talented artists like James Wan, Crystal Reed, and more on season one of Swamp Thing.

Derek Mears has played his fair share of monsters over the years. From the classic Predator in the 2010 film, Predators, to Jason Voorhees himself in the 2009 Friday the 13th remake, Mears knows his way around special effects and prosthetics. His latest project is one of his most daunting, yet rewarding, projects as he takes on the iconic mantle of DC hero, Alec Holland, also known as Swamp Thing.

Mears shares the title role with Andy Bean, who portrays the human side of Alec, while Mears dons an elaborate (but practical) suit to play the guardian of the green. We had the opportunity to chat with Derek Mears about his work on season one of the DC Universe show, Swamp Thing. He tells us about his work with the cast, his process for getting into character, his hopes for the series’ future and much more!

1428 Elm: What were your initial thoughts when you first read the script for Swamp Thing?

Derek Mears: I get to be part of something super cool. When the writers and showrunners came up with this idea for Swamp Thing my jaw just dropped. I was so excited. It’s magic. I was eager to jump into it as soon as possible.

Continue reading my full interview with Derek Mears at 1428 Elm.

Book Reviews

Book Review: The Friendship Pact by Alison James

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review: The Friendship Pact by Alison JamesThe Friendship Pact by Alison James
Published on July 3, 2019
Genres: Thriller, Mystery, Fiction
Links: Buy on Amazon | Goodreads
Pages: 270
Format: ARC

Source: NetGalley

I’m Lucy, and I have a secret.I have a beautiful home, that I’m desperate to escape. But that’s not my secret.I tell my friends I’ve never wanted children, when I always have. But that’s not my secret. My husband is a celebrated surgeon, who tries to control me. But that’s not my secret.

Adele knows. Once upon a time, I knew everything about her and she knew everything about me. Best friends forever. But now our secret is beginning to surface. I can trust her more than anyone. We made a pact. And she’s never do anything to hurt me. Would she?

This absolutely gripping psychological thriller will have you forgetting everything until the last shocking twist. Fans of Behind Closed Doors, Friend Request, and The Girl on the Train will be hooked.

If you liked Behind Closed Doors by B.A. Paris, then you will already know what to expect from this novel. It’s almost identical in plot and how it plays out.

The most significant difference is the introduction of Adele Watts, former best friend of our main character, Lucy. Their friendship was an unlikely one. Lucy has never known anything but being wealthy and privileged, while Adele is now an ex-con who has lived in or near poverty her entire life.

When we meet Lucy, she is nearing the breaking point of her marriage with a volatile, abusive, cardiologist husband, Marcus. Once she decides to get out of her situation, at any cost, Lucy reaches out to the one person she believes can help her, Adele.

The novel is called The Friendship Pact, and the synopsis teases the secret kept between Adele and Lucy as a pivotal plot in the book. The mystery does come into play, we learn about it through a now-and-then flashback format, but as far as its plot significance, it’s minimal.

The Friendship Pact is split into three parts. The first part is gripping, although I had issues with the portrayal of abuse, in the same way, I did with Behind Closed Doors, but it is more believable and less exploitative and gleefully disturbing in this book.

Once the story reaches its second and third act, all the urgency has seeped out. I found the second half of the book harder to get through, mainly because poor Lucy is passed from one abusive man to another (a mild spoiler, it’s obvious). The plot becomes increasingly predictable too. You may figure it out before you reach the half-way mark, I did. Only one twist shocked me, and it ended the first part of the book.

Another pet peeve I have with thrillers is the idea that everyone in the protagonists’ world is oblivious, stupid, or evil. I understand these things can happen in real life, but some of the side characters’ reactions didn’t seem realistic. And speaking of side characters, there were several who served no real purpose.

Should you read The Friendship Pact?

It’s not a bad thriller, it is engaging, and the author knows how to write in a gripping way. But after blowing through the first part of the novel in eagerness to find out what happened, you may find yourself as deflated as I did when the rest of the story takes a sharp decline into dullness.